Green tea may be linked to lower cancer rates

Reuters has reported that a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that there may be a link between lower risk of colon, stomach and throat cancers and regularly consuming green tea.

Researchers conducted a longitudinal study of more than 69,000 Chinese women over the course of 10 years, and the results showed that those who drank tea at least three times a week were less likely to have cancer in their digestive system, mainly the colon, stomach and esophagus.

While people who drink green tea tend to be more conscious of their health, one of the study authors, Wei Zheng, Ph.D., of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said that the researchers tried to factor in the participants’ living habits. None of the subjects drank or smoked regularly and information about their diet, exercise habits and medical records was also taken into account.

Dr. Wei Zheng told the news source that this study is not concrete evidence of a cause-and-effect relationship between green tea and cancer.

Various studies in the past on the effects of green tea have given conflicting results about the beverage’s preventative properties, and it can be difficult to determine whether one food plays a role in reducing the risk of developing cancer, reported Reuters.

Green tea benefits
According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), green tea contains the polyphenols EGCG, EGC, ECG and EC. These antioxidants help protect the cells from oxidative damage caused by free radicals. The polyphenols may also be effective in stopping the proliferation of blood vessels that tumors need to grow.

The NCI also notes that antioxidants in green tea may defend against damage caused by ultraviolet radiation and bolster the immune system.

Other antioxidant sources
The NCI reports that you can get antioxidants in a variety of fruits and vegetables such as carrots, cantaloupe, squash, apricots and kale. You may also want to take an Ultimate Reds supplement from Dr. Newton’s Naturals, which are loaded with antioxidant-rich fruit like blueberries, cherries and cranberries.

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