Vitamin B-12 Battles Allergies

new studies show vitamin b12 can help with seasonal allergy symptomsWhile pollen, mold, dust and animal dander are common triggers for allergies, there’s a hidden cause you may not think of – stress. Stress zaps the body of vital vitamin B supplies. A recent report confirms that people who are under intense stress tend to have more allergy symptoms. In one study, children who had severe allergies were temporarily moved from their own homes to a group home setting where they had the opportunity to “de-stress.” They were then exposed to dust and other substances that would normally cause a strong allergic reaction. Researchers observed a minimal allergic reaction.

Several other studies have not only made the connection between B-12 and stress, but have suggested that vitamin B12 could actually reduce allergy symptoms. For example, in a recent clinical study, a group of seasonal allergy sufferers spent up to six weeks taking massive amounts of B12 through sublingual delivery (under the tongue).

Many of the worst symptoms – sneezing, congestion and itchy, runny noses – were half as severe in the vitamin B12 group as in the placebo group. Researchers stated,“The effects were comparable to Claritin. Vitamin B12 is also much safer.”

Better still, people who were taking B12 didn’t have the tired, draggy feeling so common with antihistamine allergy medications. Another study found vitamin B12 taken at an increased dose may help protect asthma sufferers from reacting to food with sulfites.

The secret to vitamin B12’s allergy fighting success lies in its ability to “reset” the immune system. After all, allergies are characterized by an overreaction of the human immune system to a foreign protein substance (“allergen”) that is eaten, breathed into the lungs, injected or touched. This immune overreaction can results in symptoms such as coughing, sneezing, itchy eyes, runny nose and scratchy throat. In severe cases it can also result in rashes, hives, lower blood pressure, difficulty breathing, asthma attacks, and even death. Allergies are now twice as common as they were a generation ago, afflicting an estimated 50 million Americans.