How to Enjoy the Outdoors with Allergies

Seasonal allergies can make the outdoors unbearable.  Learn how to enjoy again with these tips.

Waiting Until Later in the Day Can Help

The sun is shining, the temperature is perfect and you’d love nothing more than to be outside enjoying it. But the pollen is also raging and your allergies have you feeling like your head is floating five feet above your body. You could hole up inside and admire the outdoors through a window, or you could learn how to peacefully co-exist with your allergies and get out there. Here are some tips on how to enjoy the outdoors with allergies.

Check the Pollen Count

Technology has improved. Instead of guessing, you can actually check the pollen count in your area. Try major news and weather venues online or even your local TV stations. Knowing the pollen count and which kinds of pollen are most active gives you a better idea of what reactions to expect. Knowing the weather forecast is also important as dry, windy conditions can send pollen flying, making things worse.

Wait Until Later in the Day

The worst time of day for pollen and spores is early in the morning, from around sunrise until late morning. So if you’re planning to be outside, try to make plans after lunch if possible. The temperatures may be hotter later in the day, but it could be worthwhile if it means fewer allergy symptoms.

Grow Allergy-Friendly Plants

If you have a yard or maintain a garden, take your allergies into consideration when planting. Some plants produce less pollen, or have larger pollen that is less likely to become airborne and affect your allergies.  Apple trees, boxwoods, cherry trees, dogwoods, lilacs, pear trees, and zinnias are more allergy-friendly species, while ash, birch, conifers, maples, oaks, and poplars are trees you should avoid is possible.

Take Off Your Shoes

When you come in from being outside, it is important to try and keep all the pollen in one place. If possible, designate an area where you keep all hats, jackets and especially shoes confined to a limited area or entryway. That way, the articles of clothing most responsible for bringing spores and pollen into your home are all in one place, and not spreading allergens around your living space. Keep a basket by your door for guests and ask that they remove their shoes when entering your home as well. It is also a good idea to shower after returning indoors, as this will eliminate excess pollen that may be on your skin or hair.