Broken bones in the elderly may be caused by vitamin D deficiency

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient that the body needs for various functions, one of which is to maintain the strength of bones to prevent breaks. A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine reports that individuals who are 65 or older should take at least 800 international units (IUs) of the nutrient a day to keep bones strong, as reported by Food Consumer.

Researchers from the University Hospital of Zurich analyzed the data collected from more than 31,000 geriatric patients and found that people who had the greatest intake of vitamin D had the most reduced risk of fractures. Participants who had an average of 800 IUs per day were 30 percent less likely to suffer from a skeletal injury, as compared to those who had deficient amounts of the nutrient.

Since sufficient levels of vitamin D may be difficult to achieve, individuals may benefit from taking an all-natural supplement such as Dr. Pinkus’ Sublingual Vitamin D-3 made by Dr. Newton’s Naturals, and ensuring that they expose their skin to sunlight throughout the day. In addition, the nutrient can be consumed through some foods, such as fatty fish, fish liver oils, cheese and egg yolks, according to the U.S. Office of Dietary Supplements.

The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that there are approximately 281,000 hospital admissions every year for hip fractures among older adults. Moreover, this number is projected to increase to 500,000 by 2040. Broken bones are a concern for the geriatric population and, depending on which bones are affected, could lead to more serious health complications. This is why efforts, such maintaining healthy levels of vitamin D, are essential in preventing injuries.

“High-dose vitamin D supplementation (≥800 IU daily) was somewhat favorable in the prevention of hip fracture and any nonvertebral fracture in persons 65 years of age or older,” the researchers of the study concluded, as quoted by Food Consumer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>